Bay State Perennial Farm

PERENNIALS

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Bay State Perennial Farm is known for its wide selection of perennials. Plants are listed alphabetically by their latin names and can be located by clicking on the first letter of the plant name in the alphabet above.

Bay State Perennial Farm

Dictamnus albus (not to be confused with D. albus ‘Albiflorus’

Dahlia    Look for Dahlias under Tenders.

Dalea purpurea New     (Purple Prairie Clover) Erect stems form a rounded to vase-shaped clump to 3’ tall. During June-August, flowers bloom at the ends of the stems in the form of cone-like structures densely imbued with a multitude of tiny purple trumpets, reminiscent of the flowers of clover and the tender perennial lavender,(Lavandula pinnata). Native to Missouri and hardy through zone 3. Very tolerant of hot, average to dry locations, and, it’s leguminous and therefore able to fix atmospheric nitrogen making it a valuable restoration plant. It attracts butterflies and a slew of other pollinators. Pretty enough for the border and a must-have in the meadow garden.

Darmera peltata

Darmera peltata    (Umbrella Plant) Massive, round leaves similar to Petasites form an impressive mound 3' high. Light pink flowers on tall petioles appear in May before the foliage. Requires evenly moist, even boggy soil. For part to full shade, and sun if soil is sufficiently moist. These are large, bold plants that make a memorable impression planted beside ponds and streams. Some possible companions are Japanese primula, ligularia and trollium. 

Deinanthe bifida see under Woodland Flowers

Delosperma cooperi     Flat mats of, three-sided, tube-like, succulent leaves and bright, rose-pink flowers from summer to hard frost. Exotic looking, totally eye-catching! In our borders it gets lots of attention from nursery visitors. Needs hot full sun and excellent drainage. Good drainage is essential, without it plants will die. Zone 6, (5 with proper citing and some good luck).

Delosperma ‘Fire Spinner’     Extra large flowers of bright orange, darkening to magenta near the center, completely blanket this hardy Ice Plant in June. Use at the front of the sunny, well-drained border and rock garden where they’re especially effective when allowed to work their way around rocks or to drape over edging stones. Zone 4.

Delosperma dyeri Red Mountain       2" tall x 18" wide mats of succulent green foliage are covered from June through Sept. with daisy-like, coral red flowers with bright white centers, very flashy! Impossible to take your eyes off the dazzling show put on by this little gem for most of the summer. Perfect for drapping over edging boulders, for rock gardens and well-drained containers. For sun, with well drained soil. Plants will not tolerate excess moisture. Zone 5(4).

Delosperma dyeri Red Mountain Flame New     Bright orange-red flowers on plants with a very compact habit. One of the brightest Ice Plants. Deer resistant. Zone 4.

Delosperma Jewel of the Desert Series ‘Amethyst’ New     Hardy succulent that bloom from early spring until late October with bright purple flowers with white centers. Best in full sun with average, very well-drained soil. Winter drainage is essential for survival in New England. Great for tucking in among rocks, pavers or anywhere you would grow creeping Sedum or Thyme. Attract butterflies. Deer resistant.

Delosperma sphalmanthoides New     Stemless, very low 1” high cushions of tiny, upfacing, succulent leaves carrying reddish purple blooms in summer. Very appealing for its tiny size which allows it to weave through even the tightest crevices between edging and paving stones. Full sun, and average soil with better than average drainage. Zone 5

Delphinium    Despite their somewhat demanding nature,- fertile, moist, but well drained soil, full sun and the likely need of staking - it’s hard to imagine a garden,-or a bouquet- without Delphiniums. A second bloom can be had by removing spent flower stalks immediately after flowering.  FullSun-s 04-Drip2 01-Hummingbirds Butterfly scissors

    elatum ‘Cobalt Dreams’ New    Masses of semi-double, cobalt blue flowers with a white bee that bloom through summer on tall, sturdy 4’-6’ spikes. For rich, evenly moist, well-drained soil in full sun,(in other words, the best of everything), A stunning sight in the garden and in arrangements. Attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. I strongly recommend staking these taller varieties as there isn’t a more disheartening sight in the garden than a bent and broken planting of these “Queens of the Garden”. Staking is only a little bit of extra work. The thought of doing it is worse than the actual doing of it. Worth the trouble, and you’ll be glad you did it. Zone 3.

Delphinium grandiflorum 'Blue Butterfly'

grandiflorum 'Blue Butterfly'    Low, (16ins. high), loose, open stalks of iridescent, marine blue flowers starting in late spring/early summer and continuing through most of summer if deadheaded. They are more carefree than their more statuesque cousins—no staking, no pests. A beacon of color in the early summer border. 

    exultatum  see under Woodland Flowers

    tricome  see under Woodland Flowers.

    x belladonna ‘Connecticut Yankees’    A lower growing, sturdy and reliable strain in a mix of colors ranging from deep purple, through every shade of blue, to white. Well branched flower stalks rise 3 ft. above a thick tuft of basal foliage and bloom over a very long period, essentially all summer if flowers are cut. Easy to grow in average or better, fertile, evenly moist soil. If soil is lacking fertility, a simple spring and summer broadcast of a balanced fertilizer will do the trick. No staking required. Plants thrive here in our sandy loam.

    x elatum ‘Dasante Blue’   Vibrant true-blue flowers with light purple accents and white bees. Grows to only 3’ tall with a more uniform, compact habit, so will not require staking. Valued for their dramatic vertical form and vibrant color. Excellent for cutting. All Delphiniums do best in sun with rich, well-drained soil.

    x elatum ‘Pagan Purples’     This 'New Millennium Hybrid' has become a favorite with gardeners, especially those who enjoy cutting their flowers. Tall growing to 4ft. or more, with beautiful, dark blue-purple spikes on robust stems in summer. The stunning deep purple spires are the focal point of the sunny, summer border. Zone 3.

Dendranthema    Look for many additional Dendranthema varieties as the season progresses

Dendranthema ‘Cambodian Queen’    A sport of ‘Sheffield’ with a similar constitution and habit but with pink flowers. A hardy, late blooming mum that begins setting buds in early September. Buds begin opening to pink flowers later in September and continuing opening for four weeks or more, displayed well above the foliage in a profuse display for a spectacular swan song to the gardening season. Attracts butterflies, deer resistant. Zone 3.

Dendranthema ‘Hillside Sheffield’   3', hardy, old-fashioned mum with late-season, single flowers that open soft pink and phase to a delicious, smooth apricot. Flowers are attractively displayed on long stems, well above the foliage. Blooms profusely in late Sept.- Oct, putting on a fantastic show when most of the garden has shut down for the winter. Zone 3.

DIANTHUS (Pinks, Carnations)     An old-fashioned favorite, most with deliciously fragrant flowers, good for cutting. All require excellent drainage and prefer a slightly alkaline soil, and full sun unless noted otherwise. Many benefit from division every two or three years to remain vigorous and most attractive.FullSun-s Drip 04-Drip2 Butterfly scissors

    barbatus ‘Sooty’     (Sweet William) Dark chocolate flowers with a white spot in the center bloom heavily in spring and early summer, continuing into summer at a respectable rate. Attractive, modestly spreading, dark green to reddish foliage provides an effective backdrop for the exciting, dark colored flowers. An heirloom variety.

    barbatus barbarini ‘Purple’    (Sweet William) Heavy flowering over a long period with large purple flowers held above the foliage on strong stems, 1' tall. Effective in mixed borders. Containers and in memorial plantings. Showy and easy to grow. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Zone 3. 

    barbatus barbarini ‘Red Picotee’     (Sweet William) Showy deep red flowers with a glistening white edge. Blooms most of the summer with very little attention. Very effective at the front of the border, draping over rocks and in containers. Also a good choice for cemetery planting. Easy to grow, with bright flowers that bloom for a long period. For sun, with average soil. Zone 3.

    barbatus barbarini Salmon     Large salmon colored flowers from spring through summer. Low growing and clumping, modestly spreading, long-blooming and carefree, Sweet William is a classic border, container and window box plant with a rugged constitution and long bloom period. Will grow just about anywhere and look great, except in heavily shaded swamps.

    ‘Betty Morton’ New     Low growing mats of silvery blue-green, needle-like foliage capped by single, rosy pink flowers with a sizable dark fuchsia-red eye. 5”-8” tall. Blooms May-June. Deer resistant.

    ‘Coral Reef’ (Scent First Series) New   Early carnation type, very fragrant and cuttable flowers, double coral pink with white picotee edges. Super fragrant and early to flower. 1’ tall. For the border and the cutting garden, if you enjoy gathering cuts from your own garden, it doesn’t get much better than having a ready source of these beauties. For sun with average or better, well-drained soil. Attracts butterflies. Zone 6.

    deltoides ‘Flashing Lights’(Maiden Pink)     Low, spreading, dense mats of dark green foliage are the launching pad for hundreds of tiny bright red flowers that twinkle above the thick, ground covering foliage from early spring through summer. Excellent in the rock garden, also effective as the first tier of bloom at the front of the mixed border. 6" high and 2' or more wide. An inexhaustible blooming machine that thrives in average, well drained soil, in full sun. Zone 3.

    ‘Fire Star’ (Star Series) New    Beyond cute with knock-your-socks-off, crimson/red, single, strongly clove scented flowers in early summer and again in early fall with sporadic bloom in between. Forms a neat clump, only 8” high by 8” wide so it’s perfectly suited for smaller gardens, containers and it’s especially effective between edgers and stepping stones. Few requirements beyond a spot in full sun with average, well-drained soil. Attracts butterflies, deer resistant. Zone 5.

    gratianopolitanus ‘Firewitch’      (Cheddar Pink) This mat-forming pink produces a torrent of single, fragrant, bright magenta flowers atop wiry stems arising from attractive mats of, deep blue, grass-like foliage. Blooms profusely in May-June with sporadic bloom through summer. For full sun with average, well-drained soil. Grows to 6” tall by 12” wide, tolerates heat and drought, attracts butterflies. deer resistant. Perfect for rock gardens, for planting between boulders and paving stones and for group planting for an eye-catching, long-blooming and carefree display.  2006 PPA Perennial Plant of the Year, vary hardy, zone 3.

    gratianopolitanus ‘Tiny Rubies’    Short, grass-like, tufted mounds with a multitude of miniature, double, rose-pink flowers on 4-6in. stems, May-June. Very cute little gems that cry out to be wedged between edging stones, inserted between pavers for out-of-the-ordinary effect, and used in troughs and rock gardens. Zone 3.

    ‘Rose Dawn’ New     A 4”-6” dwarf alpine form that blooms in spring with an exuberant show of double, rose flowers over tidy gray/green tufts, in spring. Full sun, average, well-drained soil. Deer resistant. Zone 5.

    ‘Starlette’ (Star Series) New   A terrific addition to any Dianthus collection and to gardening in general. Very double, almost pom pom-like, clove scented, deep, raspberry-pink flowers over carpets of blue/green foliage, with an overall height of 6”-8”. Blooms heavily for many weeks in spring with diminished but respectable bloom through summer, especially if an effort is made to remove spent flowers. Attracts butterflies. A boon to northern gardeners given its zone 4 and possibly even zone 3 hardiness rating.

    x caryophyllus ‘Angel of Peace’ New    (Clove Pink) Single clear pink flowers with a red eye. Very fragrant. Compact garden habit with flowers produced all season. 8” tall. A bright, perky, hardworking little gem, that will perform best in full sun in average, well-drained spots such as between edging stones and in crevices between pavers, at the front of well-drained borders. Attracts butterflies. Zone 4.

    x caryophyllus ‘Raspberry Surprise’ New  So heavy flowering that at peak bloom the foliage is completely obliterated by 2”, double, pink flowers; and just imagine the mega burst of fragrance! At 10” high, it’s a little taller than most other Clove Pink, making it more appropriate for general border planting, while still entirely suitable for inserting into crevices between rocks and pavers. Also, its taller stems cut well for smaller arrangements. Full sun and average, well-drained soil.   Attracts butterflies. Zone 4.

    x caryophyllus ‘Rosebud’ New     (Clove Pink) Double salmon-pink, fragrant flowers through summer, especially if spent flowers are occasionally trimmed off. A nice hot color to keep the excitement going right through the dog days of summer. Longer bloom is obtained through removal of spent flowers. 8” high. Sun and good drainage are the main requirements. Attracts butterflies. Zone 6.

Dicentra eximia (Fringed Bleeding Heart) & formasa (Western Fringed Bleeding Heart); selections of:     Attractive green or blue-green, deeply cut, fern-like foliage 8-12ins. high with flower stalks rising an additional 6-8ins. above the foliage. Depending on the selection, flower color is a deeper or lighter shade of pink, or, white. Very long blooming, beginning in spring and continuing for many weeks. A carefree, adaptable plant, happy in sun and all but the deepest shade, and not at all finicky about soil. There is considerable confusion about the parentage of many of the fringed bleeding heart cultivars, some sources listing D. eximia, and others D. formosa. They are very similar looking. Differences are minimal, discernable only under close inspection.  FullSun-s PartialShade-s 04-Drip2 01-Hummingbirds

    eximia ‘Alba’    1-1’ tall arching flower stems arise from the crowns carrying delicate white hearts all summer. Foliage is light green, deeply cut, fern-like and forms a attractive background for the abundant blooms. A very pretty, medium sized perennial that’s easy to please in sun or part shade with average soil. If plants should begin looking a little tired in summer, a hard cutting back will result in fresh new foliage and flowers for the rest of the year. Self seeds with a high percentage of true flowers. Looks great scattered randomly throughout the perennial border. Zone 3.

Dicentra King of Hearts175

‘king of Hearts’    A complicated hybrid with beautiful, lacy, fern-like, blue-green foliage and bright, cherry-pink  flowers that last all summer, usually out-blooming D. ‘Luxurient. Could be grown for the beautiful foliage alone. 8-10ins. high. Zone 3.

    ‘Luxurient’   Rich, purple-rose flowers that are, let's say, three shades darker than the species, attractively dangled from arching stems that rise 15ins. above the delicate, textured foliage. These are long blooming plants for sun or part shade. If they seem unhappy where you've got them, just cut them back and move them to somewhere else until you find a spot that suits them, and, if they're large enough, you may be able to get a couple of divisions while you're at it! Zone 3.

    spectabilis 'Alba'     White flowered version of this timeless perennial favorite. Similar in size and garden performance to the more commonly seen pink form, but with pure white “hearts” suspended from long, gently arching stems. Grows from 2-3’ high and wide and, in our garden, blooms from mid-spring unitl well into summer. May go dormant with the onset of hot summer temperatures. Long-lived, pest free and very undemanding to grow, requiring average or better, evenly moist, well-drained soil in sun to part shade. Older plants that have become quite large are quite a spectacular sight in bloom! Zone 3.

Dicentra s. 'Goldheart'

spectabilis ‘Goldheart’     This combination of pink flowers against golden yellow foliage does not produce the color collision one might expect, instead, quite the opposite.  The flowers are just the right shade of pink to blend with the lovely, smooth golden foliage to create a very handsome collaboration, eye-catching without being garish. We have it in a fairly sunny spot yet the foliage persists well into summer, and, as long as the foliage persists it retains the excellent golden color. I like it more and more every year.

    spectabilis ‘Valentine’   Not all "new" plants are the "improvement" they claim to be but, in this case, the claim is entirely justified. This beloved garden classic has been given a make-over that colors it noticeably redder overall and the red coloring lasts for the entire season. Foliage, stems and flowers are a darker shade than the species, as well, the plants are more compact but just as vigorous. 2-3' tall. Zone 3.

Dictamnus albus ‘Albiflorus’   (White Flowered Gas Plant) Large white flowers with petals that curve back at their tips creating an elegant, widely-flared, trumpet-shaped flower. Flowers are carried high above the foliage on strong, 1-1' stalks. Foliage is dense, dark green, very attractive.  This is a bold, sturdy perennial that is attractive both in and out of bloom, establishing such a solid presence in the garden that one could easily mistake it for a shrub. Blooms heavily for 2-3 week in mid June.Once in the ground, plants should not be move as they resent disturbance and want to be left un-fooled-around-with for an indefinite period, much like a peony. Beautiful, long-lived and pest free.

Dictamnus

Dictamnus albus ‘Purpureus’ (Gas Plant)    A stately display of large pink flowers with petals that curve back at their tips creating an elegant, widely-flared, trumpet-shaped flower. Flowers are carried high above the foliage on strong, 1' stalks, overall plant height is 3’ tall. Foliage is dense, dark green, very attractive.  This is a bold, sturdy perennial that is attractive both in and out of bloom, establishing such a solid presence in the garden that one could easily mistake it for a shrub. Blooms heavily for 2-3 week in mid June. Once in the ground, plants should not be move as they resent disturbance and want to be left un-fooled-around-with for an indefinite period, much like a peony. Beautiful, long-lived and pest free.

Digiplexis ‘Foxlight Ruby’  See under Tenders

Digitalis (Foxglove)    Popular garden favorites with tall colorful spikes of pendulous bells. Thrive in soils rich in organic matter. Some are biennial, but they self-sow freely. Best performance is in full sun with evenly moist soil, though plant seem to do reasonably well in afternoon shade FullSun-s PartialShade-s 04-Drip2 03-Drip3 01-Hummingbirds scissors

    ferruginea ‘Yellow Herold’ New    Blooms in early summer on exceptionally tall stems, up to 5’ tall. Flowers are larger than those of the species, with the typical streak of rust coloring. Unbeatable for vertical accent. Attracts pollinators, resists deer. Zone 3.

Digitalis grandiflora (ambigua)

grandiflora (ambigua) ‘Carillon’     Large, soft yellow flowers on 3-4ft. spikes over apple -green basal foliage. Tough, versatile, plants that show strong perennial tendencies. For full sun to light shade with reasonable moisture. Zone 3.

    lutea    4-6” long, glossy, pea-green leaves form an attractive, base mound giving rise to 2-3’ tall flower stalks which carry tiny, ” long, canary yellow flowers. Flowers are borne on one side of the stem only, blooming for several weeks beginning in late spring-early summer. For sunny locations, also light shade, with average or better, reasonably moist but well-drained soil. An heirloom variety that has been grown in New England for 200 years. Plants show perennial tendencies and often persist in the garden longer than Digitalis pur. hybds. Attracts hummingbirds, deer resistant. Very cute, with charm to spare! Zone 4.

    obscura (Sunset or Willow-leaved Foxglove)     Distinctive orange/umber flowers line 2' tall spikes from late spring into summer. Blue/green, willowy foliage is thickest, rosette-like, at the base of the plant, with progressively smaller leaves continuing up the stalks, clump forming, perennial. Unlike most other Foxgloves, this species does well in average, well-drained soil and becomes more drought tolerant as it establishes. Does not do well in wet places. Its uniquely colored flowers are highly prized by hummingbirds and gardeners alike, but plants are shunned by rabbits and deer. Native to southern Spain and northern Africa but hardy through zone 6 and probably 5.

    parviflora ‘Milk Chocolate’ New     Tall spikes covered in small, chocalate-colored flowers, over 100 flowers per stalk! Neat green foliage forms neat basal rosettes that launch the soaring, 3-5' high flower spikes, June-July. A different and exciting color. Plants are beautiful by themselves and effective at toning down brighter colors and for melding with weaker shades in unexpected combinations. Zone 4.

    purpurea (Common Foxglove)     A classic border plant if ever there was one, so evocative of mythical fairy tale gardens and forever emblematic of everything that’s good about gardening.  4-5’ high spikes of purple-pink, down-facing gloves cast their spell over the garden for 2-3 weeks in spring, and bloom can be extended by cutting back spent flower stalks to encourage blooming side shoots. Be sure to allow some seed to mature and drop so new plants will start. Full sun to light afternoon shade and moist soil is preferred, but foxgloves are very forgiving of less than ideal conditions. Strictly speaking, the common foxglove is biennial and not perennial but one hardly notices the difference since their prolific self-seeding insures that there are always fresh plants in the garden. Zone 4.

    purpurea ‘Dalmatian Peach’ New    Pink buds open to uniquely colored flowers that are a blend of peach, pink and yellow. 2’-3’ tall, midspring blooming, continuing for many weeks. Ideally, rich, evenly moist soil is best, and, it’s generally recommended that plants be cut back before they become ratty looking with the onset of summer heat(making sure to leave enough stems to guarantee self-seeding. Attracts the usual community of pollinators, but are deer resistant. Zone 4.

    purpurea ‘Candy Mountain’    The first foxglove with upfacing flowers. Large, rose-pink, upward facing gloves are tightly packed all around the 3-4ft. sturdy stems. Flowers open wide allowing a good view of their attractive interiors. Blooms in late spring, early summer with a distinctive look, unlike any other foxglove. Grow in sun to light shade with even moisture. Zone 4.

    x mertonensis    A hybrid of D. purpurea and D. grandiflora with 2-3ft. stalks lined with strawberry pink colored gloves from late spring into summer. The robust nature of these plants is immediately apparent from the sturdy flower stems, the thick textured, dark green leaves and correspondingly large, beefy flowers. A number of years ago I saw an amazing, one hundred foot long, mass planting of this hybrid at the Montreal Botanic Garden.

    x purpurea ‘Camelot Lavender’ (Camelot Series)     A hybrid foxglove that's one of the very best for flower quality and long bloom period. The lavender flowers are produced all around the stems and are carried in a horizontal plane creating a pleasant face(gardener) to face(flower) viewing perspective, plus making it easy for nectar seekers to dive right to the center of the flowers. For sun to light shade with rich, moist but well-drained soil. Fantastic for creating that nostalgic, country garden feel. Good for cutting. 4' tall. Attracts hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Zone 4.

    x purpurea ‘Camelot Rose’ (Camelot Series)    A hybrid foxglove that's one of the very best for flower quality and long bloom period.. The rose/pink flowers are produced all around the stems and are carried in a horizontal plane creating a pleasant face(gardener) to face(flower) viewing perspective, plus making it easy for nectar seekers to dive right to the center of the flowers. For sun to light shade with rich, moist but well-drained soil. Fantastic for creating that nostalgic, country garden feel. Good for cutting. 4' tall. Attracts hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Zone 4.

    x purpurea ‘Camelot White’ (Camelot Series)      A hybrid foxglove that's one of the very best for flower quality and long bloom period. The white flowers are produced all around the stems and are carried in a horizontal plane creating a pleasant face(gardener) to face(flower) viewing perspective, plus making it easy for nectar seekers to dive right to the center of the flowers. For sun to light shade with rich, moist but well-drained soil. Fantastic for creating that nostalgic, country garden feel. Good for cutting. 4' tall. Attracts hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Zone 4.

Draba aizoides ‘Napoleon’ New    Low, 2”-4”stems carry umbels of bright yellow flowers over tight basal rosettes. Blooms early-mid spring. Tough little gems that get things going early in the garden with their bright, perky blooms. Ideal for plugging between edging boulders for a charming, early spring, pick-me-up. Sun, with average, reasonably moist but well drained soil. Zone 3.

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Location of the Nursery:
Bay State Perennial Farm
36 State Road (Routes 5 & 10)
Whately, MA 01093
(413) 665-3525

 

Mailing Address:
Bay State Perennial Farm
P.O.Box 706
N. Hatfield, MA 01066

 

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